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Archive for April, 2009

Las Vegas Hospitality Jobs Get Help from LVCVA

Wednesday, April 29th, 2009

Officials are doing their part to help save Las Vegas hospitality jobs.

The City of Las Vegas has been under fire lately by the federal government as being a hub of conventions and meetings that cause companies to spend too much money. Since then, the city has seen several meeting and event cancellations, resulting in a loss of jobs and revenue.

There are typically 22,000 meetings and conventions held in Las Vegas. Those help support 46,000 jobs and represent $8.5 billion in economic activity, according to an article by MeetingNews.com.

In an effort to combat its recent negative press, the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority has launched a comprehensive toolkit to provide information and resources for meeting planner customers and hoteliers at www.vegasmeansbusiness.com.

Through the toolkit, buyers can access statistics, client testimonials and other information showing why Las Vegas events are successful. Hotel partners will find tools to promote group travel and updates on local business and Congress.

The LVCVA also has a booking invenctive that awards planners with a new hybrid vehicle for any meeting booked and held between June 1 and August 31 through its eRFP program. It also will give away three VIP trips to Las Vegas for an event on those dates.

In addition, the LVCVA has launched several other incentives to address the current economic recession, including a massive sales call effort and attendance promotion programs for existing clients.

With any luck, these efforts will help restore Las Vegas’ hospitality industry. In March, the Las Vegas-Paradise area’s leisure and hospitality employed 265,500 workers, according to the United States Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics. This is down from 257,000 workers during February and a 5.8 percent decrease from last year.

Jobs in Las Vegas Suffering Amidst Recession

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2009

Jobs in Las Vegas are suffering under the hands of the current economic recession.

During March, the city’s unemployment rate increased from 10.1 percent to 10.4 percent, much higher than the national unemployment rate of 8.5 percent and the highest since 1983. This also makes for the third straight month of double-digit unemployment.

According to the Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation, there were 104,100 people without work during March, an increase of 1,600 people from February.

Overall during March, the Las Vegas-Paradise area had a total non-farm employment of 875,700 workers, according to the United States Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics. This is down from 878,600 workers during February and a 5.2 percent decrease from last year.

Once again the construction industry was hit the hardest, employing 81,200 workers during March, down from 81,900 workers during February and a 14.3 percent decrease from last year.

Other industries that saw an over-the-year decrease in jobs include:

  • manufacturing by 6.2 percent
  • trade, transportation and utilities by 3.4 percent
  • information by 6.3 percent
  • financial activities by 5.2 percent
  • professional and business services by 8.9 percent
  • leisure and hospitality by 5.8 percent
  • other services by .4 percent
  • government by .4 percent

The mining and logging industry employed 400 workers, the same as during February and last year. The only industry that saw an over-the-year increase in jobs was education and health services. That industry employed 68,100 workers during March, up from 67,800 workers during February and a 3.8 percent increase from last year.

Las Vegas Teaching Jobs Will be Cut

Wednesday, April 15th, 2009

It’s a bad time to be a teacher in Las Vegas. Click here to see education job listings.

The Clark County School District Board recently adopted a $2 billion budget, which would cut 850 teaching positions throughout the Las Vegas area. The district plans to begin sending termination notices after May 1, according to an article by UPI.

These layoffs follow a plethora of program cuts and other cost-saving measures as the district looks to close a $120 million budget gap for the 2009-2010 school year. It is expected that a variety of extracurricular activities will be cut and that many students will have fewer academic options as some schools switch from eight-period school days to six-period school days.

The scheduling adjustments are expected to help schools stick to a district mandate that requires schools to be staffed at 97 percent of their normal rate in order to meet current enrollment demands.

It was previously reported that Clark County could lose up to 1,000 teaching jobs and the district was identified as one of seven across the nation most vulnerable to budget cuts. The areas, which are suffering from higher-than-normal amounts of home foreclosures, use local property tax revenue as a large budget source.

Clark Countyís 2008-2009 budget came in at $2.1 billion, with 31 percent coming from local property taxes. With 311,240 students, Clark County is one of the fastest-growing school districts in the country. The districtís schools will most likely have to cut jobs through attrition and leaving vacancies unfilled.

Las Vegas Jobs Created by Gaming Industry

Tuesday, April 7th, 2009

The Las Vegas area’s casino and gaming industry creates many different Las Vegas jobs.

There are more than 200,000 casino-related jobs in Las Vegas, according to an article by Alec.co.uk. The city’s gaming workforce is made up of more than employees seen on casino floors, and includes those who work in hotels, shops, spas, catering outlets, bars, giving tours and those who provide other services.

For those seeking a job in a casino itself, dealing is most known profession. Dealers are preceded by box men, floor men, pit bosses, shift bosses and book managers. There also are jobs that serve gamblers, such as cocktail waitresses, keno runners, bar staff, security personnel, change booth operators, slot floor workers, pit clerks, porters and casino cage cashiers.

Behind the scenes are the slot staff, tour managers, guides, accountants, auditors, clerks, couriers and runners, television surveillance personnel, maintenance staff, casino manager, games director, credit management, human resources and marketing, public relations and advertising teams.

Hotels, which are sometimes connected to casinos, employ general and reservation management teams, front desk managers and clerks, concierge, baggage handlers and catering and housekeeping staff.

The many shows throughout the city also require their own workers, which may include stage and sound technicians, camera operators, technicians and box office and administration staff.

Those with management positions earn the highest salaries. Dealers make the second-highest income, with baccarat dealers, blackjack dealers and craps dealers earning the most. Most dealers earn minimum wage and tips, while blackjack dealers can earn anywhere from $40 to $180 a day in tips and baccarat dealers can earn up to $250 in tips.

Following dealers, cocktail waitresses, food waiters and waitresses make the most money. Security guards also usually make a considerable amount of pay, ranging from $75 to $120 per day, depending on experience.

Las Vegas Construction Jobs Continue to Decline

Thursday, April 2nd, 2009

Las Vegas construction jobs once again saw the biggest over-the-year decrease during February.

During February, the Las Vegas-Paradise area’s construction industry employed 82,200 workers, according to the United States Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics. This is down from 82,900 workers during January and a 13.7 percent decrease from last year.

Overall, the Las Vegas area’s unemployment rate increased from 10 percent to 10.1 percent during February. The area had a total non-farm employment of 880,000 workers during February, down from 881,400 workers during January and a 4.5 percent decrease from last year.

Other industries that saw an over-the-year jobs decrease during February include:

  • manufacturing by 6.6 percent
  • trade, transportation and utilities by 3.1 percent
  • information by 7.2 percent
  • financial activities by 5.2 percent
  • professional and business services by 6.3 percent
  • leisure and hospitality by 5.3 percent
  • other services by .8 percent

The only industries that saw an over-the-year jobs increase during February were education and health services by 4 percent and government by .8 percent. The mining and logging industry employed 400 workers, the same as during January and last year.

Statewide, Nevada‘s unemployment rate increased from 9.4 percent during 10.1 percent during February. The state had a total non-farm employment of 1,217,700 workers, down from 1,225,800 workers during January and a 5.2 percent decrease from last year.